Talking to Kids About Japan

kids watching TVIt’s been just over a month since a devastating earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis first rocked Japan.

Since that time:

  • More than 188,000 people continue to be displaced;
  • More than 125,000 blankets; 183,000 items of clothing; 26,000 relief kits and 11,000 sleeping kits have been handed out to survivors staying in Red Cross evacuation centers.
  • Several aftershocks as well as significant tremors have struck;
  • Scientists, workers, and government officials continue to deal with a nuclear crisis that is now judged to be equal to the Chernobyl disaster;
  • Millions of dollars – including donations from schoolchildren around the world – have been pledged by individuals and organizations to help the people of Japan deal with the crisis;
  • The American Red Cross has collected more than $158 million for Japan relief. The Japanese Red Cross has collected more than $800 million and is beginning to disburse some of those funds to affected people this week; and
  • The first 36 of 70,000 temporary homes were presented to displaced families in Iwata prefecture.

Because there is still so much bad news mingling with the good work people are doing to help the victims of the multiple disasters in Japan, it can be difficult for children to cope with the situation.

Even thousands of miles away, children can be profoundly affected by the news.

Because this crisis is ongoing, it can be even more difficult for children to deal with how they are feeling.

Download KidCulture’s free PDF, Tips for Talking to Children About Global Crises, to help you talk with children about the crisis in Japan and identify strategies to help them feel more secure.

Keep in mind that one of the best ways to help children deal with bad news and scary situations is to give them something over which they have control.

Whether it’s holding a bake sale, lemonade stand, or yard sale with the intention of donating the proceeds to the Red Cross or another Japan relief organization, every child can make a difference. And that helps give them the confidence they’ll need to deal with crises when they get older.

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