Tag Archives: Chef Danielle Turner

The Donut/Doughnut Project

DonutsRaise your hand if you need a pick-me-up. If you’re still recovering from:

  • A seemingly endless winter;
  • Stressful work load;
  • Agonizing semester of school;
  • Bad breakup;
  • Good breakup
  • Assorted life changes;
  • Parenting.

Take your pick of excuses to luxuriate in a 20 mouth-watering, decadent, and global donut/doughnut recipes presented to you in a special partnership between KidCulture and CookingClarified.com.

As moms, writers, and donut lovers, this is our April gift to you. Over the course of the Donut Project, I will be providing the global context for these fabulous donuts from around the world and Chef Danielle of Cooking Clarified will be testing and photographing the donuts.

This is a truly  heroic effort on Chef Danielle’s part – but she assures me it will be worth the sacrifice that she and her family will be making!

We’re eager to hear your comments, entertain your suggestions for other donuts you love from across the globe, and hear about your donut adventures.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Eat

French Onion Soup

Although well-known in the United States (it even appears on the TGI Friday’s menu), French Onion Soup is actually an ancient soup that originated in France and is typically affiliated with the poor because it was cheap and simple soup to make.

This French Onion Soup recipe comes from Chef Danielle at CookingClarified.com.

Of all the soup’s we’ve covered so far, this is likely the only one my mother will make! French Onion Soup is one of her favorites. Bon appetite, maman!

Leave a comment

Filed under Eat, Learn

Sweet Corn and Sweet Potato Soup

Today’s Sweet Corn and Sweet Potato soup is an original recipe from Chef Danielle Turner, author of CookingClarified.com.

Although Chef Danielle created the recipe, it relies on typical ingredients – corn and sweet potatoes – used by Southeastern Native American Indians.

As Chef Danielle says, “This soup is summer in a bowl.” We hope you enjoy it!

Leave a comment

Filed under Eat, Learn

Coconut Chicken & Shrimp Soup

chicken & shrimp soupI can thank Thai food, in part, for my friendship with Chef Danielle Turner of CookingClarified.com.

As staffers at a non-profit in Washington, DC, we used to hang out after work at a nearby Thai restaurant sampling Pad Thai, laab, crab rangoon, and talking about everything from pop culture to politics to – you guessed it – food.

She’s also a fantastic cook; my family still raves about some of the meals she’s thrown together.

So Chef Danielle’s recipe for coconut chicken & shrimp soup, which is based on the shrimp and lemongrass soup known in Thailand as Tom Yum soup, is also a great reminder of how food and friendship can go hand in hand.

Why not put together a pot of soup and invite over your best friend to share a meal and a conversation?

Click here or go to www.cookingclarified.com for Chef Danielle’s recipe.


Leave a comment

Filed under Eat, Learn

Chicken and Dumplings Soup

Chicken and Dumplings SoupFor today’s recipe, we’re sticking close to home: the Southern and Midwestern United States.

Chicken and dumplings soup is believed to have originated in these two areas of the country during the Great Depression when home chefs were trying to make the most of the resources they had.

But this dish is also popular in French Canada and is similar in some ways to Chinese wonton soup and Iran’s gondi soup which has matzoh ball-like dumplings.

This chicken and dumplings recipe is from Chef Danielle Turner at www.CookingClarified.com.

Go to Chef Danielle’s website and get the details on how to make this economical yet mouth-watering soup.

Leave a comment

Filed under Eat, Learn

Caribbean Callaloo Soup

Callaloo SoupThere’s no better way to beat the winter blues than with a taste of the Caribbean.

Callaloo soup is enjoyed throughout the Caribbean with minor variations.

Callaloo is the leafy greens that top the taro root.

In the U.S., it’s recommended that you use spinach leaves to mimic the flavor.

In addition to showcasing okra, callaloo soup also incorporates my favorite habanero pepper. If that’s too hot for you, you can leave it out or substitute your favorite hot pepper.

This recipe is from a great book I found in my local library, Better Homes and Gardens Best Ethnic Cuisines.

I would definitely recommend this book because I found some great recipes from many different cultures.

Callaloo Soup

3 strips thick-sliced bacon, chopped

½ c finely chopped onion

¼ c finely chopped celery

1 habanero

1 clove garlic, minced

4 14-ounce cans chicken broth

1 c. sliced fresh or frozen okra

12 medium shrimp

2 c. shredded fresh spinach

Salt

In a large saucepan, cook bacon over medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until crisp. Remove bacon from pan with a slotted spoon set aside. Drain all but 1 tablespoon of the bacon drippings. Add onion, celery, habanero, and garlic to pan. Cook and stir for 4-5 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

Carefully add broth to pan. Increase heat to medium-high and bring to boiling. Add okra to pan. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Add shrimp and simmer, covered 5 minutes more or until opaque. Stir in spinach and heat through. Stir in cooked bacon. Season to taste with salt.

Leave a comment

Filed under Eat, Learn

Soup’s On In January

If you’re like me, it can be difficult to re-adjust back to the ordinary routine after the excitement of the holidays. It’s not that I have a problem with January, per se, but living through the next two and a half months of snow, rain, rock salt, and biting winds really takes a toll on my psyche.

So that’s why I’m counting on soup to rescue me.

You might think soup is an unlikely superhero, but you’d be wrong.

Soup is a real global contender – as you’ll see over the next four weeks.

It is generally an inexpensive meal to prepare, in keeping with many of our New Year’s resolutions to save more.

It is also a relatively healthy food choice, usually prepared with lots of local and seasonal produce. That helps those of us with fitness resolutions this time of year.

And it is my favorite food of all time. Some of my best food associations involve soup and my grandmothers.

My grandmother Kathryn used to prepare Campbell’s tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwich for lunch for me when I was a kid and we were still allowed to go home for lunch during the school day. (I’m not that old; it was just a very quaint town.)

As an adult, I treasure the memory of my grandmother Marie making me a soul-warming potato soup when I was adjusting to new challenges in my life.

I can’t think of a better way to get through the cold, grey days of January than to celebrate with a bowl of soup.

So for the next 21 days – every day, Monday through Friday – you’ll find a recipe that I’ve discovered and am excited to share.

Some of the soups are global and some are just fantastic recipes created – or improved – by my friend, Chef Danielle Turner of www.CookingClarified.com.

I’m excited to hear your about your favorite soups, soup memories, and your coping strategies to keep a cheerful attitude over the long winter.

And I hope this little project inspires you to keep your resolutions to be financially and physically fit in 2011 and to embrace all the great things the world has to offer.

Leave a comment

Filed under Eat, Learn

Get Your Tricks, Tips for Fun Halloween

Did you know that Halloween originated as a Celtic holiday? Or that people in Germany hide their knives on Halloween night because they believe that it’s the one night of the year when ghosts return to earth? Do you know why Halloween’s traditional colors are black (for the darkness of the night) and orange (for the bonfires that are traditionally lit throughout Europe)?

With just weeks to go, Halloween madness has struck – and not just children! Halloween has become a multi-million dollar industry and is enjoying increasing popularity among adults. Too mature for trick-or-treating, grown-ups are hosting Halloween parties that offer a new take on traditional autumn foods – and giving them a ghostly twist or two!

For some ideas on what to serve at your Halloween party, check out the new e-book from www.CookingClarified.com. “Tricks and Treats: Recipes & Tips for a Delicious Halloween” is available as a free download. Just provide an email address and get lots of ideas (and even more history about Halloween past and present).

My favorite recipe is probably the Butternut Squash and Apple Soup, although the tips on caramel sauce were a close second.

1 Comment

Filed under Holiday

Can You Trust a Skinny Chef?

Paula Deen would say no and throw a stick of butter at you for asking, but with so many children and adults fighting obesity, high BMI’s, and the health conditions that follow, it seems irresponsible to reject healthier fare.

On www.howtoboilanegg.wordpress.com, Chef Danielle reviews Secrets of a Skinny Chef by Jennifer Iserloh. I happen to know Chef Danielle loves her butter, heavy cream, and French recipes, so if she can find something to love, it’s worth a shot.

Here’s a snippet of Chef Danielle’s review:

Jennifer even takes on popular takeout items, eliminating the fat in Just Like Takeout Sweet & Sour Chicken, which is a perfect storm of protein, vegetables and grains.

The Skinny Chef also serves up recipes for French onion soup, Mexican bean dip, nachos, sesame chicken, enchiladas, chicken marsala, and lo mein.

Read Chef Danielle’s entire review here.

If you’re interested, here’s the book and here’s the Skinny Chef’s website. Great tips and recipes here, too!

Leave a comment

Filed under Eat