Tag Archives: cookies

A Cookie By Any Other Name

palmiers

Photo: Real Simple

Known as palmiers in France, palmeritas in Spanish, ventaglio in Italian, and elephant ears in English, these little cookies have a devoted, global following.

It is believed that they are French in origin, where their name translates to “palm leaves.”

They are widely available in bakeries and from companies such as Goya, but they are also easy to make – so long as you don’t try to make your own puff pastry!

Here’s a recipe from Ina Garten that was posted on www.foodnetwork.com. Try it and let me know what you think.

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Cookies 3: Pizzelles

Pizzelles are one of my favorite cookies and a staple at my family cookie swap. But we don’t just eat them around the holidays. Every year at my family reunion one relative would never fail to bring them along, thus ensuring her status as the “favorite aunt”!

Pizzelles are a traditional Italian cookie. The name means “round” or “flat” and is believed to have originated in the Abruzzo region of Italy. The distinct shape of the cookie is made by using a press which resembles a waffle iron.

Once the cookie is finished off with a dusting of powdered sugar it tastes like an almond-flavored snowflake.

This pizzelle recipe was posted by BETORKAR on AllRecipes.com. I could share my family recipe, but there are just some things I won’t give up without a fight.

Pizzelles

Ingredients

6 eggs

1 1/2 cups white sugar

1 cup margarine, melted and cooled

2 tablespoons anise extract

3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

4 teaspoons baking powder

Directions

Beat eggs and sugar with an electric mixer until fluffy. Stir in the melted margarine and anise extract. Combine the flour and baking powder; stir in gradually. Dough will be sticky.

Preheat your pizzelle iron according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Drop batter by rounded spoonfuls onto the iron. Close and cook for about 90 seconds, or until steam stops coming out of the iron. Carefully remove and cool. Store in an airtight tin at room temperature.

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Cookies 2: Pepparkakor

If you like a cookie with some bite, then you’ll love to try Sweden’s pepparkakor cookies. The name means “pepper cookies” and they are similar to the ginger cookies we know and love but are thinner and more crisp.

Pepparkakor also serve as decorations. They can be cut out into any form you can imagine. After the cookies have cooled, a string is tied through a hole in the cookie and they can be hung on the Christmas tree.

Try this recipe from Kathy Seaberg and posted on AllRecipes.com.

Pepparkakor

Ingredients

2/3 cup packed brown sugar

2/3 cup molasses

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

3/4 tablespoon baking soda

2/3 cup butter

1 egg

3 1/2 cups sifted all-purpose flour

Directions

Place butter in a large, heatproof bowl. In a medium saucepan, heat brown sugar, molasses and spices just to boiling point. Add baking soda and stir in. Pour this mixture over the butter and stir until it melts.

Beat egg and mix in; add flour, a cup at a time, and blend thoroughly. Turn out onto a lightly floured board and knead 1-2 minutes. Wrap in waxed paper and chill until firm (about an hour).

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (170 degrees C).

Roll out to approximately 1/8 inch thickness on a lightly floured board and cut into desired shapes. Place on greased baking sheets and bake for 8 – 10 minutes.

Remove from sheets and cool on racks; may be decorated with piped icing or whatever else you like!

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Cookies 1: Rugelach

rugelachRugelach are rolled cookies that are in some ways similar in shape to a croissant.

They are believed to have originated in Eastern Europe and were popularized by Ashkenazic (Polish) Jews. Rugelach means “little twists” Yiddish.

Although this cookie is not fried, it has become a traditional Hanukkah dessert.

There are many mouth-watering rugelach recipes but I thought this one from Allrecipes.com sounded fast and easy for rugelach neophytes.

However, I also checked out a really gorgeous looking rugelach recipe on the blog Sugared Ellipses. Check it out and I bet you will agree!

Happy Hanukah and let me know how you enjoy the cookie!

Rugelach

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 pound butter

2 cups cottage cheese

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup raisins

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

2 tablespoons granulated sugar
DIRECTIONS:
  1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  2. Mix butter or margarine, cottage cheese and flour together.
  3. Roll the dough into a circle about 1/4 inch thick. Cut the dough into triangular wedges. Sprinkle raisins into the broad end of the wedge along with cinnamon and sugar. Roll from the broad edge toward the pointed edge to form crescents. Sprinkle the crescents with cinnamon and sugar. Arrange the cookies on an ungreased baking sheet.
  4. Bake for 12 minutes.
Recipe courtesy of Edna Weisberger via Allrecipes.com 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED © 2010 Allrecipes.com

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25 Days of Cookies

Kid eating cookiesBecause the holidays make us all a little crazy – but in a good way;

Because nothing says “special occasion” like baked goods;

Because the cookie is now and always shall be a universal harbinger of happiness for young and old;

And because there are just so many fantastic cookie recipes out there;

I am committed to sharing one cookie recipe on KidCulture every day from now until December 25.

Don’t get too excited – I’m not promising to bake them all myself – but I bet that through my research I come up with at least a few new bites to add to my holiday cookie jar this year.

So preheat your ovens, pull on your Santa oven mitts, and flour up your rolling pins: it’s going to get a little sweet around here for a while.

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Punxsatawney Phil: Global Sensation?

images-1-1On February 2, most of us will be riveted to our TV’s to see if Punxsatawney Phil, the famous prognosticating groundhog from Pennsylvania, sees his shadow and forecasts six more weeks of winter.  Frankly, that is unthinkable at this point. 

Anyway, I grew up with Phil as a regional attraction; I had no idea he was becoming a global celebrity.   But it’s all right there in black and white at www.groundhog.org.  Every year we hear teachers and other people from around the globe who ask for suggestions on how to properly celebrate this unique holiday.”

I’ve checked out the site and I think this idea is my favorite:  groundhog cookies. 

2 cups sifted flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground cloves

1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon

1/2 cup soft butter

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup molasses

1 egg yolk

1 egg, slightly beaten

Currants or raisins

 

Sift together first seven ingredients. Set aside. Cream butter and sugar until fluffy. Blend in molasses and yolk. Stir in flour mixture and mix well. Form into a ball.

Wrap in plastic wrap. Chill overnight, several nights or freeze.

Place small amounts of dough on a sheet of plastic wrap, and cover with plastic wrap. Roll 1/8 inch thick. Cut out cookies with lightly floured cutter.

Place cookies on greased baking sheet. Brush with slightly beaten egg. Decorate with currants or raisin eyes. Repeat until all dough is used.

Bake 8 to 10 minutes in a preheated 350-degree oven. Cool slightly before removing from cookie sheet. Makes 72

 or more medium-sized groundhogs.

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