Tag Archives: cookingclarified.com

French Onion Soup

Although well-known in the United States (it even appears on the TGI Friday’s menu), French Onion Soup is actually an ancient soup that originated in France and is typically affiliated with the poor because it was cheap and simple soup to make.

This French Onion Soup recipe comes from Chef Danielle at CookingClarified.com.

Of all the soup’s we’ve covered so far, this is likely the only one my mother will make! French Onion Soup is one of her favorites. Bon appetite, maman!

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Sweet Corn and Sweet Potato Soup

Today’s Sweet Corn and Sweet Potato soup is an original recipe from Chef Danielle Turner, author of CookingClarified.com.

Although Chef Danielle created the recipe, it relies on typical ingredients – corn and sweet potatoes – used by Southeastern Native American Indians.

As Chef Danielle says, “This soup is summer in a bowl.” We hope you enjoy it!

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Chicken and Dumplings Soup

Chicken and Dumplings SoupFor today’s recipe, we’re sticking close to home: the Southern and Midwestern United States.

Chicken and dumplings soup is believed to have originated in these two areas of the country during the Great Depression when home chefs were trying to make the most of the resources they had.

But this dish is also popular in French Canada and is similar in some ways to Chinese wonton soup and Iran’s gondi soup which has matzoh ball-like dumplings.

This chicken and dumplings recipe is from Chef Danielle Turner at www.CookingClarified.com.

Go to Chef Danielle’s website and get the details on how to make this economical yet mouth-watering soup.

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Caribbean Callaloo Soup

Callaloo SoupThere’s no better way to beat the winter blues than with a taste of the Caribbean.

Callaloo soup is enjoyed throughout the Caribbean with minor variations.

Callaloo is the leafy greens that top the taro root.

In the U.S., it’s recommended that you use spinach leaves to mimic the flavor.

In addition to showcasing okra, callaloo soup also incorporates my favorite habanero pepper. If that’s too hot for you, you can leave it out or substitute your favorite hot pepper.

This recipe is from a great book I found in my local library, Better Homes and Gardens Best Ethnic Cuisines.

I would definitely recommend this book because I found some great recipes from many different cultures.

Callaloo Soup

3 strips thick-sliced bacon, chopped

½ c finely chopped onion

¼ c finely chopped celery

1 habanero

1 clove garlic, minced

4 14-ounce cans chicken broth

1 c. sliced fresh or frozen okra

12 medium shrimp

2 c. shredded fresh spinach

Salt

In a large saucepan, cook bacon over medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until crisp. Remove bacon from pan with a slotted spoon set aside. Drain all but 1 tablespoon of the bacon drippings. Add onion, celery, habanero, and garlic to pan. Cook and stir for 4-5 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

Carefully add broth to pan. Increase heat to medium-high and bring to boiling. Add okra to pan. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Add shrimp and simmer, covered 5 minutes more or until opaque. Stir in spinach and heat through. Stir in cooked bacon. Season to taste with salt.

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Soup’s On In January

If you’re like me, it can be difficult to re-adjust back to the ordinary routine after the excitement of the holidays. It’s not that I have a problem with January, per se, but living through the next two and a half months of snow, rain, rock salt, and biting winds really takes a toll on my psyche.

So that’s why I’m counting on soup to rescue me.

You might think soup is an unlikely superhero, but you’d be wrong.

Soup is a real global contender – as you’ll see over the next four weeks.

It is generally an inexpensive meal to prepare, in keeping with many of our New Year’s resolutions to save more.

It is also a relatively healthy food choice, usually prepared with lots of local and seasonal produce. That helps those of us with fitness resolutions this time of year.

And it is my favorite food of all time. Some of my best food associations involve soup and my grandmothers.

My grandmother Kathryn used to prepare Campbell’s tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwich for lunch for me when I was a kid and we were still allowed to go home for lunch during the school day. (I’m not that old; it was just a very quaint town.)

As an adult, I treasure the memory of my grandmother Marie making me a soul-warming potato soup when I was adjusting to new challenges in my life.

I can’t think of a better way to get through the cold, grey days of January than to celebrate with a bowl of soup.

So for the next 21 days – every day, Monday through Friday – you’ll find a recipe that I’ve discovered and am excited to share.

Some of the soups are global and some are just fantastic recipes created – or improved – by my friend, Chef Danielle Turner of www.CookingClarified.com.

I’m excited to hear your about your favorite soups, soup memories, and your coping strategies to keep a cheerful attitude over the long winter.

And I hope this little project inspires you to keep your resolutions to be financially and physically fit in 2011 and to embrace all the great things the world has to offer.

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Fresh Ideas on School Lunches

Even though the school year is only a few weeks old, many parents (like me) have already fallen into the school lunch doldrums. Even when they are lucky enough to have a child willing to try new things, they’re just at a loss for what to serve that’s nutritious, portable, and able to withstand the typical child’s backpack until lunchtime.

Well, fret no more because my friend (who happens to be a super-talented chef) has some ideas for you. Chef Danielle is the creator of www.cookingclarified.com and she recently put together a FREE, downloadable e-book called Lessons in Lunch that will give you some fresh, multicultural ideas to answer the question: what’s for lunch?

You may also be interested in my cameo appearance in the e-book as the author of an article on school lunches around the world.

Happy Reading! (And Eating!)

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