Tag Archives: Easter Eggs

Global Recipes for Easter Eggs

Whether you have hard-boiled Easter eggs to use up or not, spring is the perfect time to look at how different cultures around the world enjoy hard-boiled eggs.

In Ethiopia, hard-boiled eggs are a traditional part of the meal. Dishes such as doro wat call for a hard-boiled egg for each person. Most Ethiopians are live in rural areas and can raise their own chickens and collect their own eggs. In fact, livestock such as chickens are an important investment for most Ethiopian families.

Many Swedish children love eating a sandwich that combines hard-boiled eggs with cod roe caviar (kalles kaviar) for a salty and delicious snack. Other variations include shrimp and creme fraiche. KidCulture has already answered the question, “Can you feed a kid caviar?” in this blog post.

Scotch eggs are hard-boiled eggs, wrapped in sausage, rolled in bread crumbs and then deep-fried. I’m not sure how likely your children are to eat it so try it out on some willing grown-ups first! Here’s a Scotch egg recipe from Epicurious.com and a YouTube video that shows you how to do it.

In the Philippines, egg sarciado is a boiled egg recipe in a tomato and onion sauce. Here’s an egg sarciado recipe you can try.

If you love Filipino food, check out Ang Sarap, a blog with recipes from the Philippines and other parts of the world.

And for more amazing egg ideas ranging from omelets to soft-cooked eggs and more, check out Around the World in 80 Eggs from Smithsonian magazine.

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Filed under Africa, Asia, Eat, Europe, Holiday

The History of Easter Eggs

Easter EggThe tradition of dyeing eggs in the spring actually predates Christianity, although it is very heavily associated with the Christian holiday of Easter.

Ancient Egyptians, Persians, Phoenicians, and Hindus all believed that the world began with a giant egg, so it was natural to adapt the egg as a symbol of new life and rebirth in the spring.

More than 2,500 years ago, Zoroastrians decorated eggs for their New Year celebration, called Nowrooz.

During the Passover Seder, Jewish tradition holds that hard-boiled eggs, called Beitzah, are dipped in salt water and eaten.

Some of the most famous egg-decorators are Christian, however.

At Greek Easter, believers dye eggs red to represent the blood of Jesus Christ and his suffering on the cross. The hard shell of the egg represents the sealed tomb. Cracking it represents his resurrection.

In fact, a common game at Greek Easter is to crack eggs against each other to replicate the cracking of the tomb. The person whose egg lasts the longest (by not cracking) is the winner and is assured good luck over the coming year. Recipes and information about Greek Easter celebrations are available here.

Ukrainian eggs are famous around the world. Pyysanka are brilliantly and painstakingly decorated. The eggs are usually raw although baked eggs were sometimes used. The colors came from dried plants, roots, bark, berries, and some insects. The eggs were decorated at night after the children were asleep. A group of women would work together on their designs. Beeswax was used to create designs.

Other well-known eggs include Drapanka from Poland, which are dyed shades of brown using onion skins and etched to create beautiful designs.

However you choose to decorate your eggs, they are a nearly universal symbol of new life, fresh starts, and optimism.

Happy Spring!

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Filed under Europe, Holiday, Middle East