Tag Archives: kid

Japanese-Americans Standing Up for Muslims

Here’s an interesting article from the Washington Post about how Japanese-Americans, who remember how they were treated in the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor, are responding to House Homeland Security Chairman Peter T. King (R-NY)’s decision to hold hearings about Muslims in America.

It’s wonderful to read how times of crisis can bring what we think of as disparate groups close together. And it’s definitely a message worth sharing with our children.

In school, at the playground, and in life they may be the only people available to stand up for someone else. Especially in this time of heightened awareness over bullying, it’s important to recognize that the skills they develop to deal with it in childhood will be useful to them throughout their lives.

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Cookies 6: Goro

The goro, Norway’s “affluent” cookie, is very similar to the fattigman, or the “poor man’s cookie.” The one big difference is that the goro is baked and not fried in fat.

The goro is also prepared using a special iron to give it a distinct shape.

This goro recipe was posted by Jennifer on AllRecipes.com.

Goro

Ingredients

3 eggs

1 cup white sugar

1 cup heavy cream

1 cup butter, melted

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground cardamom

Directions

In a large bowl, beat eggs and sugar until thoroughly blended. Mix in the cream and melted butter. Sift together the flour, cinnamon and cardamom; stir into the egg mixture. Refrigerate dough for at least an hour.

Heat goro iron and lightly coat with grease. On a floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/8 inch thickness. Cut into circles to fit your goro iron using a paper pattern. Place onto heated iron, close and cook, turning once, until golden. Carefully remove from the iron, and cut into thirds while still warm.

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Cookies 5: Fattigman

I know what you’re thinking. These cookies sound delicious – and they are.

But this Norwegian cookie actually mean’s “poor man’s cookie” because it is fried in cheap oil, not baked on a fancy cookie press like Norway’s “affluent” cookies, the goro (don’t worry; we’ll get there).

Of course, when I first heard about these cookies, I thought the name was Norwegian for “fat man.” Live and learn.

This recipe is from Tarteausucre, who posted it on Food.com.

Fattigman

Ingredients:

6 egg yolks

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/3 cup light cream

1 tablespoon butter, melted

1/3 cup granulated sugar

2 1/4 cups flour

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 tablespoon lemon rind, grated

confectioners’ sugar

  1. Beat together egg yolks and salt until thick and light.
  2. Beat in light cream, sugar and butter.
  3. Sift together flour and nutmeg. Add to egg yolk mixture with lemon rind.
  4. Mix well, then chill 1 hour.
  5. Roll out 1/4 of the dough at a time, keeping the remaining dough chilled.
  6. Roll 1/16 inch thick. Cut in 1 1/2-inch wide strips. Cut diagonally at 4-inch intervals. Make 1 inch slit lengthwise in center of each piece.
  7. Slip one end through the slit. Fry a few at a time in deep fat (350 degrees F) for 1 to 2 minutes or until golden.
  8. Remove from fat with a slotted spoon. Drain on paper towels.
  9. Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar. Store in an airtight container.

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Cookies 4: Springerle

Springerle are a German rolled Christmas cookie. My great-grandmother made these cookies and my grandmother remembered them fondly.

Springerle means “little jumper” or “little knight” and it borrows its technique from that used to emboss designs on Christian bread. The different designs on springerle have evolved a little over the years.

Although they’re not labor-intensive, you do need a special rolling pin in order to make these cookies authentic.

My family no longer has my great-grandmother’s recipe, so I’m relying on this springerle recipe which was submitted to AllRecipes.com by Rosemarie Magee.

Springerle

Ingredients

 

4 eggs

2 tablespoons butter

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 cups white sugar

4 cups all-purpose flour

1/4 cup anise seed

Directions

 

Beat eggs in large mixing bowl until very light.

Add sugar and butter. Cream together until light and fluffy.

Sift flour, baking powder, and salt. Add dry ingredients and combine.

Knead dough until smooth … add more flour to get a smooth dough if necessary.

Cover dough and allow to chill in refrigerator for at least 2 hours.

Roll onto slightly floured board to 1/2 inch thickness. Then roll again with springerle roller to make designs. Cut at border. Sprinkle anise seed on clean tea towel and place cookies on this. Allow to stand overnight (don’t cover) to dry.

Bake 12 to 15 minutes at 325 degrees F (170 degrees C).

Cool completely. Store in tight tin container … the longer they are stored, the more anise flavor they take up.

 

Springerle Roller

 

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Cookies 3: Pizzelles

Pizzelles are one of my favorite cookies and a staple at my family cookie swap. But we don’t just eat them around the holidays. Every year at my family reunion one relative would never fail to bring them along, thus ensuring her status as the “favorite aunt”!

Pizzelles are a traditional Italian cookie. The name means “round” or “flat” and is believed to have originated in the Abruzzo region of Italy. The distinct shape of the cookie is made by using a press which resembles a waffle iron.

Once the cookie is finished off with a dusting of powdered sugar it tastes like an almond-flavored snowflake.

This pizzelle recipe was posted by BETORKAR on AllRecipes.com. I could share my family recipe, but there are just some things I won’t give up without a fight.

Pizzelles

Ingredients

6 eggs

1 1/2 cups white sugar

1 cup margarine, melted and cooled

2 tablespoons anise extract

3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

4 teaspoons baking powder

Directions

Beat eggs and sugar with an electric mixer until fluffy. Stir in the melted margarine and anise extract. Combine the flour and baking powder; stir in gradually. Dough will be sticky.

Preheat your pizzelle iron according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Drop batter by rounded spoonfuls onto the iron. Close and cook for about 90 seconds, or until steam stops coming out of the iron. Carefully remove and cool. Store in an airtight tin at room temperature.

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Cookies 1: Rugelach

rugelachRugelach are rolled cookies that are in some ways similar in shape to a croissant.

They are believed to have originated in Eastern Europe and were popularized by Ashkenazic (Polish) Jews. Rugelach means “little twists” Yiddish.

Although this cookie is not fried, it has become a traditional Hanukkah dessert.

There are many mouth-watering rugelach recipes but I thought this one from Allrecipes.com sounded fast and easy for rugelach neophytes.

However, I also checked out a really gorgeous looking rugelach recipe on the blog Sugared Ellipses. Check it out and I bet you will agree!

Happy Hanukah and let me know how you enjoy the cookie!

Rugelach

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 pound butter

2 cups cottage cheese

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup raisins

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

2 tablespoons granulated sugar
DIRECTIONS:
  1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  2. Mix butter or margarine, cottage cheese and flour together.
  3. Roll the dough into a circle about 1/4 inch thick. Cut the dough into triangular wedges. Sprinkle raisins into the broad end of the wedge along with cinnamon and sugar. Roll from the broad edge toward the pointed edge to form crescents. Sprinkle the crescents with cinnamon and sugar. Arrange the cookies on an ungreased baking sheet.
  4. Bake for 12 minutes.
Recipe courtesy of Edna Weisberger via Allrecipes.com 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED © 2010 Allrecipes.com

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Election Day Reading

Grace for PresidentElection Day is my father’s favorite holiday. Growing up, he got each of his four children involved in political campaigns and public service at a young age. This has had an excellent impact on each of us. You don’t have to love politics in order to get involved. Of the four of us, we vary widely in political parties, opinion, and involvement. But each of us learned a lot about the way our system of government works and the impact that one person (and one family) can have.

Here are a few books to help you teach your children about government, politics, and why Election Day is a reminder of why we’re among the most fortunate people on earth.

Grace for President by Kelly DiPucchio, illustrated by LeUyen Pham

I Want to Be President by Dan Liebman

Duck for President by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by Betsy Lewin

 

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Autumn Books

Mouse's First FallReady for the end of summer? Eager to jump into a pile of fresh leaves or go apple picking? One way to build excitement for the new season upon us is through books. Here are a few suggestions for books that may get your child – and you – in the spirit of the autumn season.

Clifford: Apple Picking Day by Samantha Brooke, illustrated by Jim Durk

Mouse’s First Fall by Lauren Thompson, illustrated by Buket Erdogan

Apples, Apples, Everywhere: Learning About Apple Harvests by Robin Koontz, illustrated by Nadine Takvorian

Busy Animals: Learning About Animals in Autumn by Lisa Marie Bullard, illustrated by Nadine Takvorian

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Tailgating, Anyone?

I’m not really a sports fan, I just like the parties. I think that’s true for a lot of people (especially those of us who have suffered long, intense droughts when our local sports teams failed to live up to our expectations! I’m talking to you, Philadelphia Eagles!).

But one thing everyone can agree on is that we need another excuse for a party. Face it: Life – and sports – are hard; you should be permitted to face them with a sandwich in hand.

Recently, I attended a cooking class on food that can be served at a tailgate party. It was fantastic – and with a definite focus on meat, in all its glorious forms!

We enjoyed a delicious brisket with homemade barbecue sauce.

There were fantastic lamb gyros with tzatziki sauce layered over a cucumber and tomato salad.

 

 

 

 

 

Old-school sausage and pepper sandwiches (with lots of yummy tomato sauce and without).

A muffaletta sandwich which was described by my Philly cooking instructor as “New Orleans’ hoagie”.

A new take on chicken wings, this one using a muted, but still delicious, red curry.

And a gorgeous buffalo-blue cheese meatball sandwich that will make hearts soar, mouths water, and keep Tums in business!

It almost makes me crave a salad!

I did notice the increasing international flavor of Americans’ tailgate menus. As the chef pointed out, if you show up with burgers and dogs you’re going to get laughed at in the parking lot.

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