Tag Archives: Korean food

Explore Korean Food for Chinese New Year

Not only is Korean food fun to pronounce, it’s delicious to eat.

Although Korean food is less well known than Japanese and Chinese food, according to food experts, it’s set to be the hot new cuisine in 2011.

Adults trying Korean food for the first time may want to choose items that are similar to foods they already know and like. Tangsuyuk is like sweet and sour chicken. Kalbi is beef on the bone, similar to spare ribs.

For adults who love spicy food, try kimchi jigae, a spicy stew.

For children, mandu soup is a great place to begin because it’s similar to wonton soup. If they’re willing to try tofu, it’s a great, healthy choice. Tofu is flavor-friendly; with just a little soy sauce it’s similar to eating plain rice.

Bim Bim Bap is also a good choice for children because you can control the spiciness.

If they’re into noodles, ramyan are thin noodles served with broth.

 

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Food, Family, and Chinese New Year

There are few better – or cheaper – ways to introduce your child to other cultures than through food.

With so many great ethnic restaurants, it’s easy for parents to get children accustomed to foods from different countries from an early age.

However, parents may be unsure of what to order that’s kid-friendly.

In honor of Chinese New Year, which runs February 3-15, over the next few days KidCulture will provide some suggestions to help parents choose food in Korean, Japanese, and Chinese restaurants.

In each of these countries, people celebrate Chinese New Year by sharing good food with their families and friends – and that’s a custom worth adopting.

So stay tuned for some fresh, fun, food ideas to help you introduce your child to other cultures.

 

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Seoul Food

One of the best ways for me to learn about other cultures is through cooking classes. I’m lucky that my local community college has a phenomenal culinary arts program and they offer evening cooking classes for those of us eager to taste the world for $65 a class. I figure that by the time I’m able to resume my active travel schedule, I’ll know what to expect – from kimchi to doro wat.

Recently, I took a class on Korean food and it was fantastic. Although I’d eaten at Korean restaurants, I’d never attempted to cook it on my own. After this class, I will definitely be incorporating Korean dishes into my regular rotation.

One of my favorite new recipes was Bim Bim Bap, a dish of beef, chicken, or pork served over a mixture of rice and vegetables topped with a fried egg.

Bim Bim Bap

Bim Bim Bap

I was thrilled to learn how to make dumplings, too. Mandu dumplings probably came to Korea with the Mongol invasion in the 13th century. Personally, I prefer steamed dumplings, but no matter how you cook them, these dumplings are fantastic. This recipe included pork, tofu, onion, cabbage, and bean noodles. The dipping sauce was made with soy sauce, rice vinegar, sugar, green onions, and sesame seeds.

Mandu dumplings

Mandu dumplings

Fried Mandu dumplings

Fried Mandu dumplings

Dipping Sauce

Dipping Sauce

But I also loved Bulgogi, a marinated beef dish that we ate in lettuce wraps. The marinade, which consisted of soy sauce, sugar, green onions, garlic, sesame seeds, sesame oil, and chili paste, was so good I may just coat everything with it in the future!

Bulgogi

Bulgogi

But you can’t enjoy Korean food without kimchi. Ignore everything you’ve heard. If you like spicy food – really, seriously, spicy food – then you have to at least give kimchi a try. Although I don’t imagine I will make it from scratch, I would definitely buy some of this delicious dish to serve with a Korean feast in the future. But unlike many Koreans, I doubt that I’ll be eating it with breakfast!

Kimchi

Kimchi

If you’re curious about trying new foods, consider taking a class at your local community college or trying the lunch menu at an ethnic restaurant. You may not love everything you try, but it may be an eye-opening experience that leads you to adopt new favorite foods and learn more about the cultures that created them.

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