Tag Archives: PBS

10 Things Kids Should Know About Diwali

Happy Diwali! Although most Americans are unfamiliar with the festival of Diwali, it is celebrated by millions of people around the world.

Here are ten things kids should know about Diwali:

1. Diwali is celebrated by Hindus, Buddhists, Jains, and Sikhs.

2. The holiday celebrates the triumph of good over evil.

3. One of the most popular interpretations of the holiday is that it commemorates the return of Lord Rama, who left his home and battled a ten-headed dragon. When he returned home after 14 years, villagers laid out lanterns to line the route.

4. Diwali means “row of light.”

5. Diwali is also a new year’s celebration.

6. To celebrate Diwali, observers go to temple and pray, light small clay lamps, wear new clothes, fireworks, and share delicious food with family and friends.

7. Diwali was first celebrated at the White House in 2003; in 2009, President Barack Obama participated in the White House Diwali celebration.

8. Diwali is one of the most important festivals for Hindus.

9. Diwali is celebrated for five days.

10. To wish a friend a happy holiday, you can say “Happy Diwali” in English or “Deepavali ki Shubhkamnayein” in Hindi.

Host your own celebration at home tonight by making Coconut Chicken and Vegetable Curry from Kitchen Explorers on PBS.

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Filed under Asia, Faith

Cooking the Books for Some Kid Fun!

readingTwo of my favorite hobbies as a child (and adult) were reading and eating delicious foods.

To this day, there are some foods that I continue to associate with favorite books.

For example, when I read Little House on the Prairie, I longed to taste Ma’s flapjacks.

In The Long Winter, which I read in the summer, I could feel the chill of the blizzards she described seeping from the page and into my fingers. I compensated for their intense hunger by making sure I didn’t miss a meal!

That one book may have inadvertently led to my habit of hoarding food in the pantry when winter begins peeking over autumn’s shoulder!

Little Woman made me long for crisp, delicious apples just like the kind Jo March ate while reading sad romances in the attic on a threadbare old couch. And when Meg made blancmange for Laurie when he was sick, I puzzled over what on earth the strange food could be (it’s kind of like a pudding or flan).

For younger children, there are other excellent books that really evoke a food, culture, or cuisine.

Who hasn’t had a craving for EVERYTHING after reading The Very Hungry Caterpillar for the one-millionth time? I imagine generations of parents finally getting their children off to bed and then heading for the fridge for one cupcake, one pickle, one Ritz cracker, one lollipop, and one stomachache!

PBS’s website, Kitchen Explorers, has a fantastic listing of other children’s books that just scream food.

Some – like Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs – will be familiar while others will be new.

I know I added several books to my child’s reading list after checking out this article and I hope you will, too.

Happy eating and reading!

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Filed under Eat, Read

Develop Your Kid Handbook

People like to say that children don’t come with a parenting manual, and that’s true. From the moment they are born, children force parents to figure out the rules as they go along – sometimes with comical outcomes.

But for every parent who’s ever wondered “Am I doing this right?” (which basically includes all of us), there are resources to help develop your own “Kid Handbook.”

For me, one of the big challenges is how to share with my child all the wonderful things there are in the world while keeping him safe and happy.

So I was glad to find out that PBS has a parent section of their website that provides some tips for how to deal with the news.

As a news junkie – and someone who likes to follow what is going on in the world – I don’t like to share too much of the bad news with my son.  At six, I just feel that he’s too young. So I was eager to read PBS Parents’ tips.

PBS Parents provides these “Communications Pointers”:

  • Find out what your child knows about the news.
  • Listen to what your child tells you.
  • Ask a follow-up question.
  • Shield children under age eight from disturbing news.
  • Avoid repeated TV viewings of the same news event.
  • Monitor older children’s exposure to the news.
  • Develop an ongoing dialogue with your child about what’s happening in the world.

PBS Parents has other “Talking with Kids” guides on talking with kids about everything and talking with kids about health.  Check them out here.

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