Tag Archives: Purim cookie

Read About Purim With Kids

The story of Purim is very meaningful for Jewish people for religious and cultural reasons, and it can have special significance for anyone whose faith uses the Old Testament. But it also is a great example of a story where a young woman is the hero who saves her people.

Not only is it important for girls and boys to hear stories where a woman is the hero, but it’s also important to provide children with examples of real people exhibiting courage and conviction. These are two character traits that most adults would like to see children develop and maintain throughout their lives, so why not start by encouraging them to find role models, such as Queen Esther? Here are some book recommendations to help you share the story of Purim with the children in your life.

The Story of Esther: A Purim Tale by Eric A. Kimmel and Jill Weber

Cakes and Miracles : A Purim Tale by Barbara Diamond Goldin and Jaime Zollars

The Purim Costume by Peninnah Schram

The Queen Who Saved Her People by Tilda Balsley and Ilene Richard

When It’s Purim (Very First Board Books) by Edie Stoltz Zolkower and Barb Bjornson

To learn more about Purim with KidCulture, read The Festival of Purim and discover how to make the famous Purim cookie hamantaschen when you read our post on Purim Cookie: Haman’s Ears.

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Purim Cookie: Haman’s Ears

They go by many names – and many spellings – but the Jewish festival of Purim has one standout sweet treat in this cookie.

Hamantaschen are triange-shaped cookies that can be filled with a variety of ingredients such as poppy seeds, prunes, dates, apricots, or even chocolate.

They get their name from the villain of the Purim story, Haman, who convinced the king of Persian to allow the murder of all the Jewish people in his kingdom. The Jewish people were saved by Esther, the king’s wife, who was also Jewish, although the king did not know this until she bravely came forward.

Here’s a recipe from JewishRecipes.org that you might like to try.

There are so many ways to make these cookies that the possibilities for filling, folding, and displaying them are nearly endless. Here are some ideas to get you started.

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I also found a great article in the New York Times about one woman’s history with Hamantaschen, and her quest to make the “perfect” Purim cookie. You might enjoy reading it here.

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The Festival of Purim

EstherPurim has been described as a Jewish mash-up of Halloween and Mardi Gras. The story of Purim is well-known to readers of the Old Testament. The Book of Esther tells how Esther, the Jewish wife of a Persian king, saved the Jewish people from the plot of an evil advisor to the king, named Haman. 

Haman had a grudge against Mordecai, who happened to be Esther’s cousin. Haman convinced the king to send out a decree that called on the rest of the kingdom to kill all the Jewish people. This decree would have included Esther but the king did not know she was Jewish.

Esther – knowing that the fickle king could easily have her killed – asked the Jewish people to fast for three days and then she went to the king and informed him that she was Jewish and that Mordecai was her cousin.

The king promised to give her anything she wanted. Haman was hanged for his evil plan and Mordecai became the king’s advisor in his place. Although it was too late to rescind the order to have the Jewish people killed, Mordecai amended the order so that the Jewish people could defend themselves. The following day the Jewish people celebrated and it is this celebration that is known today as Purim.

Jewish people typically observe Purim by publicly reading the story from the Book of Esther, giving to the poor, and sharing food. Some people produce plays, dress up in costumes, hold beauty contests, and have parades.

One popular food on Purim is a cookie called hamantaschen. It is translated to mean “Haman’s pockets” or “Haman’s ears,” and their triangle shape is said to mimic Haman’s triangle hat. Check back tomorrow for a post on this awesome – and fun – cookie.

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