Tag Archives: what to eat

Russian Kasha

Russian FeastKasha is one of the oldest Eastern European foods. For more than a thousand years, Russians, as well as other Eastern Europeans, have enjoyed kasha, or buckwheat groats, in a variety of ways.

Originally conceived as a food for ceremonial events such as weddings and celebratory feasts, kasha came to be a staple of the Russian diet.

Long before Americans began to incorporate whole grains into their diets, the Russians habitually enjoyed a plate of kasha as part of their meal.

Although there are many ways to enjoy kasha, I cannot promise you that your children will fall in love with it unless it is slowly introduced and – probably – heavily camouflaged by things they do like.

You can try this recipe from AboutKasha.com that sounds intriguing, or modify the recipe I created below.

Kasha with Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and SpinachKasha with Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Spinach

4 cloves garlic, minced

8 cherry tomatoes, quartered

1 medium onion, thinly sliced

1 c. spinach

1 c. white button mushrooms, thinly sliced

1 1/2 tbsp. olive oil

Salt and pepper, to taste

Prepare the kasha according to the directions on the box. In a sauce pot, add olive oil and turn heat to medium high. Add garlic, onion, and mushrooms. Saute until softened, about 4 minutes at medium high heat. Add tomatoes and cook for about 3 more minutes. Finally, add spinach, stir and cover. Remove from heat. After 3 more minutes, stir and add more salt and pepper to taste.

Serve over the kasha. Adjust seasonings, if necessary.

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Filed under Eat, Europe

Exploring Japanese Food

Most people immediately think of sushi when they think of Japanese restaurants, or even hibachi restaurants. If you’ve been there, tried that, consider choosing something new next time you’re in a Japanese restaurant.

I admit that one of my proudest moments as a mother and amateur chef was the day my son tried sushi for the first time. Still, I understand that sushi is not everyone’s idea of a good time. So if you’re eager to introduce your child to new foods, start with something simple.

For example, gyoza are delicious Japanese dumplings that are often served with raw, diced vegetables.

Noodles are usually a big hit with kids. If your children are adept at spaghetti, try them on soba noodles, which are made from buckwheat flour and served either in a soup or with a dipping sauce on the side. Be careful – the dipping sauce can be spicy.

Udon noodles are wheat-flour noodles that are usually served in a soup paired with tofu, shrimp, and vegetables.

Whatever you choose, you can’t go wrong. Japanese food is thought to be among the healthiest in the world. Just watch out for the tempura.

 

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