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French Onion Soup

Although well-known in the United States (it even appears on the TGI Friday’s menu), French Onion Soup is actually an ancient soup that originated in France and is typically affiliated with the poor because it was cheap and simple soup to make.

This French Onion Soup recipe comes from Chef Danielle at CookingClarified.com.

Of all the soup’s we’ve covered so far, this is likely the only one my mother will make! French Onion Soup is one of her favorites. Bon appetite, maman!

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Sweet Corn and Sweet Potato Soup

Today’s Sweet Corn and Sweet Potato soup is an original recipe from Chef Danielle Turner, author of CookingClarified.com.

Although Chef Danielle created the recipe, it relies on typical ingredients – corn and sweet potatoes – used by Southeastern Native American Indians.

As Chef Danielle says, “This soup is summer in a bowl.” We hope you enjoy it!

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Peruvian Beef Stew

Peruvian Beef Stew

Photo courtesy of latina.com

Peruvian cuisine is known as one of the best in South America. Its influences range from the indigenous people to immigrants from Spain, Italy, China, Japan, and West Africa.

Peru’s traditional staples are corn, beef, and potatoes. You could easily add potatoes to this recipe, from Cooking the South American Way, to incorporate all of those foods.

Peruvian Beef Stew

3 tbsp. vegetable oil

2 medium onions, chopped

1 ½ lb. round steak, cubed

2 tsp. paprika

1 tsp. cumin

1 tsp. garlic powder

¼ tsp. red pepper flakes

1 tsp. salt

¼ c. white wine vinegar

2 c. beef bouillon

2 c. squash, peeled and cut into ½-inch pieces

1 c. frozen peas

1 c. frozen corn

3 sprigs parsley

Heat oil in a pan and sauté onions.

Add meat and brown well, about 20 minutes. Add all spices, the vinegar, and the beef bouillon. Bring to a boil, stirring to mix well. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer about 45 minutes. Add squash, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes. Add peas and corn and heat thoroughly. Garnish with parsley.

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Israeli Bean Soup

Cooking the Israeli WayI found this recipe in Cooking the Israeli Way, part of a great cookbook series geared toward children.

This recipe stood out for me because I love soup (clearly) and I like that this is a fast, vegetarian dish that still packs a lot of protein and fiber.

Israeli Bean Soup

1 tbsp. vegetable oil

1 onion, peeled and diced

1 can beans (navy or kidney)

1 small can tomato puree

2 cans beef broth

3 cloves garlic, minced

½ tsp. salt

¼ tsp. pepper

2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

3 c. water

Heat over over medium-high heat in a pot. Add onion and sauté until brown. Add beans, tomato puree, broth, garlic, salt, pepper, and parsley. Boil soup, stir occasionally, cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

 

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Ginger Beef & Noodle Soup

Ginger Beef and Noodle SoupGinger is the great food discovery of my 30s.

Until then, I’d never really appreciated this amazing little root, which combines great flavor and healthy properties. Chinese herbalists have been using ginger in food and medicine for more than 2,500 years, so it’s no wonder that it plays such an important role in Chinese food.

Ginger is especially helpful in warding off and minimizing colds and the flu – all the more reason to give this soup a chance!

This recipe, which is based on the well-known Chinese dish, is fast and easy to prepare. Enjoy!

Ginger Beef & Noodle Soup

10 oz. lean beef tenderloin, cut into ¼ in. strips

2 c. water or beef broth

1 c. shitake mushrooms, thinly sliced

¼ c. rice wine vinegar

2 tbsp. soy sauce

3 large cloves garlic, minced

2 tsp. sesame oil

1 tbsp. ginger, minced

¼ c. sliced green onion

¼ c. canola oil

Directions:

In a large bowl, add beef strips, rice wine vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, sesame oil, and ginger.  Stir until the meat is covered, set aside to marinate.

In a saucepan, heat canola oil over high heat.  When oil ceases to crackle, add shitake mushrooms.  Cook on high for 2-3 minutes.

Add the beef and marinade to the saucepan.  Cook until meat is browned on all sides, about 5-7 minutes at high heat. Add water or beef broth. Bring to a boil. Add noodles. Cook for 7-10 minutes or until noodles are desired consistency.

Remove from heat. Garnish with green onion and serve.

 

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Brazilian Chicken and Rice Soup

There are few foods that go better together than chicken and rice.

In Brazil, they’ve created a fantastic soup from this combination called Canja con Arroz.

This recipe is from Cooking the South American Way. The photo is from a blog called Flavors of Brazil.

Brazilian Chicken Rice Soup

1 chicken, cut into pieces

2 stalks celery cut into 4 pieces

1 carrot

1 onion, quartered

2 tsp. salt

¼ tsp. pepper

8 c. water

Place in a stockpot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, simmer for 1 ½ hours. Use a colander to strain broth into a bowl. Set chicken pieces aside to cool. Discard vegetables. Return liquid to pot and add the following ingredients:

2 stalks diced celery

2 carrots, peeled and diced

1 medium parsnip, peeled and diced

1 medium turnip, peeled and diced

1 tomato, chopped

1/3 c rice

¼ tsp. basil

¼ c chopped parsley or chives

Cover and simmer for 20 minutes. When chicken is cool enough to handle, cut meat into bite-size pieces. Add to broth and heat thoroughly. Serve hot.

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Peshawari Broth

Peshawar is a famous city in northwestern Pakistan which has been officially recognized as one of the oldest cities on earth.

This recipe, from At Home with Madhur Jaffrey, is based on a traditional broth soup that is served before the main meal in Peshawar.

One of the things I really like about this book is that it not only looks at Indian food but it also includes recipes from Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.

While you can buy a MILLION books on how to cook Italian or Chinese or Mexican food, how many books teach you recipes from Sri Lanka or Pakistan?

I love that Madhur Jaffrey is giving these countries – and their cultures, people, and cuisines – a chance to be better known.

Unfortunately, I could not find a photo for Jaffrey’s recipe so I used a photo of aab gosht, a Pakistani meat broth, upon which Jaffrey based her recipe.

Peshawari Broth with Mushrooms and Fish

5 ¼ c. beef broth/stock

½ tsp. whole cumin seeds

½ tsp. whole fennel seeds

1 tbsp. whole coriander seeds

6 cardamom pods

6 whole cloves

½ tsp. black peppercorns

Salt

1 tbsp. olive or canola oil

4 oz. fresh oyster mushrooms, broken apart into 1 ½ in pieces

1 fresh green bird’s eye chili or about 1/8 tsp of any fresh hot green chili, finely chopped

½ lb fillet of any white fish such as flounder, without skin, cut into 1 x 2 in pieces and sprinkled lightly with salt on both sides

4 tbsp. chopped cilantro

Put the broth, cumin seeds, fennel seeds, coriander seeds, cardamom, cloves, and peppercorns in a medium pan and bring to a boil. Cover, turn heat to low and simmer very gently for 20 minutes. Strain, then pour strained broth back into the same pan. Check the salt and make adjustments, if needed.

Pour the oil into a nonstick frying pan and set on medium high heat. When hot, put in the mushrooms and green chili. Stir and sauté for about 2 minutes or until the mushrooms have softened. Salt lightly and stir. Transfer the contents of the frying pan to the pan with the broth.

Just before eating bring the broth to a boil. Slip in the fish pieces, turning the heat to low. When the fish pieces turn opaque and the broth is simmering, the soup is ready. Sprinkle in the cilantro, stir once, and serve.

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Zuppa di Zucchini

Zuppa di ZucchiniThis soup is just fun to say!

And because it uses zucchini – which is usually readily available in either fresh or frozen form at the supermarket – it’s an easy recipe to fall in love with.

You won’t have to worry about losing access to the main ingredient!

This recipe is from the Mediterranean Cookbook. The photo is from www.letschow.net.

Zuppa di Zucchini

¼ c. butter

¼ lb. onion, peeled and sliced

1 ½ lb. zucchini, thinly sliced

3 pints chicken stock

2 eggs

3 tbsp. finely grated Parmesan cheese

1 tbsp. chopped fresh basil, 2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

Salt

Black pepper

Serve with freshly toasted bread

Grated parmesan cheese

Melt the butter in a large pan, add the onion and fry gently for 5 minutes. Add the sliced courgettes (zucchini), stir well to mix with the butter and cook over low heat for 7 or 8 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the stock and bring to boil. Then cover and simmer gently until soft, about 20 minutes. Puree the soup in an electric blender or pass through a sieve, then return to pan.

Bring the soup back to a boil. Beat the eggs, cheese and herbs together thoroughly in a bowl and beat in a few tablespoons of the hot soup. Pour all into the saucepan and stir continuously over low heat for 2-3 minutes, until the soup thickens slightly; do not allow to boil or it may curdle. Check the seasoning. Put a slice of toast in each soup plate, pour the soup over it and serve immediately. Hand the cheese separately.

 

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Miso Soup

Miso SoupOne of my favorite soups is served at a restaurant in Morrisville, PA called Concerto Fusion.

It’s a totally yummy spicy seafood miso soup that for some reason only appears on the takeout menu.

I order it every time I’m there, but that’s just not enough for me.

While I try to figure out how they make this fantastic soup, I’ve also been playing around with a more standard version of miso soup.

Now I get that some people are scared off by the double threat of tofu and seaweed but you’ve got to give this soup a chance.

Once you do, I guarantee you’ll be back for more!

Miso Soup

1 package extra-firm tofu

1 c. shitake mushrooms, sliced

2 tablespoons soy sauce

3 tablespoons miso paste

1 18 oz container of vegetable stock

¼ c. green onions (2 stalks)

Gently press as much excess water as possible out of the tofu using paper towels.

Bring the vegetable stock to a boil over high heat, add mushrooms, cover and reduce heat to medium.  Cook for 2-4 minutes.

Add the soy sauce and miso paste, bring soup back to a boil.

While the soup cooks, slice the tofu into small pieces, less than ½ inch square.

Add the tofu to the soup, cover and reduce heat.  Cook for 3 minutes.

Garnish with sliced green onions and serve.

 

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Soupa Avgolemono

Soupa AgvolemonoThis delicious egg and lemon soup comes from Greece.

I love the idea of lemon in soup; it sounds so crisp and refreshing after the often heavy soups we find in restaurants this time of year.

This recipe comes from a fun little book called The Mediterranean Cookbook.

The reason I liked this cookbook so much is because it really showed the connections among North Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. I like anything that draws connections between people. And what better way to do that than through food!

This picture is from a website that is a big hit with me – www.athousandsoups.com. Check it out for more ideas!

Soupa Avgolemono

1 ½ quarts chicken stock

1-2 bouillon cubes

½ c rice

2 large eggs

2 ½ tbsp. lemon juice

Salt

Black pepper

1 tbsp. fresh parsley

Bring the stock to boil in a large saucepan, then taste it and if necessary add stock cubes to strengthen the flavor. Throw in the rice and simmer gently until the grains are just tender about 12-15 minutes.

Beat the eggs with a whisk until well mixed and frothy and add the lemon juice. Stir in about 4 tablespoons of the simmering stock, then pour slowly back into the saucepan, stirring constantly. Over very low heat continue cooking and stirring for  few minutes, just until the soup thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon lightly. On no account allow to boil or curdling may result.

Add salt and pepper to taste, sprinkle with parsley and serve at once.

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